ryancrobert:

fucking show-off

ryancrobert:

fucking show-off

(Source: kittiezandtittiez, via bubble-butt-bernard)

runs-on-ramen:

necessary:

he needs those parts for his space ship

he’s going to otter space

runs-on-ramen:

necessary:

he needs those parts for his space ship

he’s going to otter space

(Source: jajaneenee, via bubble-butt-bernard)

dilfgod:

u got any dr pepper

dilfgod:

u got any dr pepper

(Source: zay4ik, via cultofnicky)

INXS – Kiss The Dirt (Falling Down The Mountain) (4,943 plays)

jumpinpunkins:

INXS - Falling Down The Mountain

(Source: retracingben, via stay-tonight-in-a-lie)

(Source: delicacydiva, via stay-tonight-in-a-lie)

(Source: sweetest-heartland, via stay-tonight-in-a-lie)

grapost:

Billy Idol

grapost:

Billy Idol

(via stay-tonight-in-a-lie)

(Source: fraternityrow, via glitteringfrownies)

band-blog696:

"Destruction is a form of creation."
Donnie Darko (2001)

band-blog696:

"Destruction is a form of creation."
Donnie Darko (2001)

(via aseabird)

pixography:

Rene Magritte ~ “The Human Condition”, 1933

Two of Magritte’s favored themes were the “window painting” and the “painting within a painting”.  The Human Condition is one of Magritte’s earliest treatments of either subject, and in it he combines the two, making what may be his most subtle and profound statement of their shared meaning.
The Human Condition displays an easel placed inside a room and in front of a window. The easel holds an unframed painting of a landscape that seems in every detail contiguous with the landscape seen outside the window. At first, one automatically assumes that the painting on the easel depicts the portion of the landscape outside the window that it hides from view. After a moment’s consideration, however, one realizes that this assumption is based upon a false premise: that is, that the imagery of Magritte’s painting is real, while the painting on the easel is a representation of that reality. In fact, there is no difference between them. Both are part of the same painting, the same artistic fabrication. It is perhaps to this repeating cycle, in which the viewer, even against his will, sees the one as real and the other as representation, that Magritte’s title makes reference. <renemagritte.org>

pixography:

Rene Magritte ~ “The Human Condition”, 1933

Two of Magritte’s favored themes were the “window painting” and the “painting within a painting”.  The Human Condition is one of Magritte’s earliest treatments of either subject, and in it he combines the two, making what may be his most subtle and profound statement of their shared meaning.

The Human Condition displays an easel placed inside a room and in front of a window. The easel holds an unframed painting of a landscape that seems in every detail contiguous with the landscape seen outside the window. At first, one automatically assumes that the painting on the easel depicts the portion of the landscape outside the window that it hides from view. After a moment’s consideration, however, one realizes that this assumption is based upon a false premise: that is, that the imagery of Magritte’s painting is real, while the painting on the easel is a representation of that reality. In fact, there is no difference between them. Both are part of the same painting, the same artistic fabrication. It is perhaps to this repeating cycle, in which the viewer, even against his will, sees the one as real and the other as representation, that Magritte’s title makes reference. <renemagritte.org>

(via glitteringfrownies)

babydmt:

une-allegresse:

Body comparative

woah

(via same-deep-water-as-you)

post-punker:

Jim Reid of The Jesus &amp; Mary Chain

via

post-punker:

Jim Reid of The Jesus & Mary Chain

via

(via aseabird)

"Long story short I walked out of an ice club, a nightclub, and slipped over on the ice, and I dislocated me elbow, and I spent all this morning in the hospital. The painkillers are rather good, actually!" 

(Source: andytaylors, via simonlebon)

post-punker:

Andrew Eldritch of The Sisters Of Mercy, Bielefeld, Germany, 1985

post-punker:

Andrew Eldritch of The Sisters Of Mercy, Bielefeld, Germany, 1985

(via aseabird)

1970’s Style Icons : Patti Smith

“I know fashion is a material thing but we live in a material world and I love clothes. My style says ‘look at me, don’t look at me.’ I just really don’t care what you think! I took a little bit from Keith Richards and a lot from Bob Dylan. I like to call it expensive bum.”

(Source: you-belong-among-wildflowers, via aseabird)